Donnerstag, 30. März 2017

Samurai Drum - An experiment in painting lacquered armour

Coming from a WWII painting background I am used to varnish all my figures / models as matt as possible. With regard to samurai armour I was always a bit unsatisfied with the result, it just didnt appear lacquered anymore after the matt varnish treatment, the shine was missing. So I thought about the possible ways and came up with the following three ways:

1. Painting the lacquer effect
Definitely the most difficult method, applying NMM techniques and actually painting all the light reflexes a lacquered armour may have. Most time consuming process and the worst: One small mistake may ruin the whole painting. So I decided that this is not my favourite method :-)

2. Using gloss varnish
Quite simply its about varnishing only the armour parts with gloss varnish whereas all other parts (clothing, skin etc.) remains matt. You achieve quite a contrast - but does it look real? Not sure yet, looks a bit too "wet" for me. I used that method on the 2 guys in black armour.

2. Using gloss medium for the edges
Thats basically the way I paint armour in general, using metal paints on matt varnished metals to get the look of metal reflections. Just a bit modified: Mixing the armour highlight colour with Vallejo gloss medium and applying it on the raised surfaces like edges after having applied a coat of matt varnish before. I used that method on the guy in brown armour.

Pls. let me know what do you think which painting style fits samurai armour best - maybe you know a different way?




Kommentare:

  1. 1st one looks best from the picture but reading about it the 3rd option sounds interesting. Have to try that myself!
    /Hans

    AntwortenLöschen
    Antworten
    1. Thanks for your opinion, Don Hans. Its a bit difficult to see on the photos but I think the 3rd alternative looks best.

      Löschen
  2. Now your back to painting the figures that made me a follower of your site. Love your Samurai figures. The third picture where you do the comparsion, the one on the right (gentlemean in brown) looks best. So if I am not confused that is your option 3. It's hard to tell with these photos and am sure in person you can instantly tell.

    I just picked up some of that Vallejo medium, learning how to make glazes, and this might help mine pop.

    Every time I see one of your Samurai it motivates me to go back to painting mine.

    Cheers
    Kevin

    AntwortenLöschen
    Antworten
    1. Thank you, Kevin. I suffered from a serious lack of samurai inspiration. However, reading Hawleys book about the Imjin War the interest in samurais returned once more. So be prepapred to see some more in the future :-)

      Löschen
    2. That sounds excellent! I may very well get mine back out as well. Based on your excitement about Hawleys book I went and bought it on my kindle. I also ordered a hard copy used of Stephen Turnbull's "Samurai invasion: Japans's Korean War 1592 - 1598. I read a reviewer piece that said reading Turnbull's book first and then the other helped in understanding. Thanks for the head's up.

      Cheers
      Kevin

      Löschen
  3. The method you did for the black is what I personally do and I think it looks good.

    Your brown one looks very nice though!

    AntwortenLöschen
    Antworten
    1. Thanks, Kym. I read somewhere that dark brown was indeed the most common colour for samurai armour.

      Löschen